About


Dos Aguas

[+]We see water facts in the news every week:…

Just the Facts? “All we want are the facts.” Some of us remember those words from Joe Friday, Dragnet’s TV portrayal of a police sergeant in 1950’s Los Angeles. Dos Aguas is focused on the stories about the Earth’s water, and about humans’ attempt to manage our use of water. Relevant facts must be considered carefully and in detail [click the sidebar headers to see references or more detail], but facts by themselves don’t give us full understanding or tell us how to act.

[+]The Spanish phrase entre dos aguas…

The core interest of Dos Aguas is the people who find water, move it, clean it, the people who use water (lots or little), the people who study water – what they do, how they speak, what they look like, what they think. Humans are story tellers at heart. If we can learn from our stories to put the facts and our own experiences in the proper context – to know the facts but also feel what it’s like to be on the front lines of what’s happening with our world’s water – then perhaps we have a better chance at figuring out what should come next. Stories have a way of revealing aspects of our world we didn’t notice before – both for the listener and the teller. If any of us can ever see the big picture, it will come from understanding the details of all our water stories, and putting the whole together. Pointillism of water. May these stories capture the truth and the spirit of the people who live them, and be interesting even to those not fascinated with water.

Water distribution by truck

Water distribution by truck

Flood time at the dam

Flood time at the dam

Industrial waste

Industrial waste


[+]Water Footprint means…

Water. Water is a key character in all these stories. It takes many forms, has multiple personalities and moods, and is not always predictable. Yet all life on Earth – human, animal, plant – depends on it. This life which surrounds and infuses us was created in a long-ago soup of the very same water we use today. And every organism’s survival requires a strategy to find the water it needs. While the salmon swims in her water, from stream to ocean and back again, and the saguaro cactus can store enough water from a heavy August rain for months to come, the human body will last only a few days without a new supply.

There is no substitute – nothing we can use instead of water to sustain life. The human population of the earth is increasing, more mouths, more food, more vehicles and energy and factories all needing water. And each of us is using more water than our parents, not only in showers and toilets and gardens, but to manufacture cell phones and computers, electricity, automobiles, gasoline. Since Earth’s supply of water is constant – we can’t manufacture it, or get rid of it – each day it’s becoming harder to have it available when and where we need it, and how we need it – fresh, clean, clear, without salt or contaminants.

History
Occasionally historical informants make themselves available to Dos Aguas. They bring stories from the past, and other perspectives on the issues we face today. Their contributions can be accessed through the ‘Historical Informants’ menu, and have a color all their own.

Staff

Rick Bowman

Rick Bowman

Rick Bowman, Dos Aguas Publisher and Editor

Rick writes and publishes Dos Aguas, with more than a little help from his subjects and friends. He has had a few other careers – in health care research and IT, and software development. Very early in this winding path he developed an interest in water, how it behaves and how it is managed, and along the way acquired a few skills in schmoozing, research and writing. It’s a portable fascination, providing interesting people and topics in every locality. Sandbagging the Mississippi River in spring floods, driving across frozen lakes in the Upper Midwest, following the rivers and pipelines in the Middle East, learning about desert water in the US Southwest. Rick’s zeal is to burrow into information about the events and the participants to find relevant stories behind water issues.